Friday, January 20, 2012

January 21st

Theodor Nissl (21-01-1878 - 16-02-1972) German composer


Dr. Theodor Nissl [Thanks to Александр Никитин]



Theodor Nissl was an advocate of the chess composing school known under the name of "Neudeutscher Schule". He composed his first problems shortly before WWI and became friends with numerous chess composers through epistolary exchanges (J. Kohtz & C. Kockelkorn, F. Sackmann, etc).

He was also a chess player: the reader may discover his game against Siegbert Tarrasch (Munich 1933).

A short biography in German can be found on Wikipedia.de. Other information in German can be found in the article "Das Pfälzer Dreigestirn" written by Dr. Hermann Weissauer about three composers from the Palatinate region - P.A.Orlimont, Franz Sackmann and Theodor Nissl.
The Nissl theme is nowadays better known under the name of Phoenix theme.

Nissl, Theodor
Main-Post, 14th Mar 1959
2nd Prize


#5 11 + 10

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Nissl, Theodor
Deutsche Schachblätter, 1962 (21)
1st HM


#6 6 + 9

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Bernhard Hegermann (21-01-1878 - 10-08-1965) German composer

Bernhard Hegermann is mostly known for the h#28 below, which is the longest existing correct helpmate. There is not much information available about him. In December 2008 Mirko Degenkolbe seemed to have material enough for an article to be published in October 2009, but until now, to my knowledge, the article has not been published yet in Die Schwalbe. If anyone knows more about this, please send me that information.
Readers interested in the length record for helpmates may read online Mirko Degenkolbe's article in harmonie 86.

Hegermann, Bernhard
The Problemist, 1934


h#28 11 + 7

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Another example of Hegermann's style:

Hegermann, Bernhard
Tijdschrift vd NSB, 1927


h#5 3 + 13

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Diyan Kostadinov
(21-01-1982) Bulgarian composer and International Master


Diyan is a young but already well-known chess composer who composes Bulgarian specialties such as selfmates and fairies, but also studies, directmates and helpmates. He is the man behind the website Kobulchess.com which presents news, tourneys, awards, pages about composers, articles and other goodies and certainly deserves your visit.

Костадинов, Диян
FIDE World Cup, 2011
2nd Prize


s#7 12 + 12

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Костадинов, Диян
Sachova Skaldba, 2004
1st Prize


s#3 16 + 8

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Albert Kauders (21-01-1854 - 27-04-1912) Austrian composer

Gold, Sámuel & Kauders, Albert
International Chess Magazine, 1885


#3 6 + 10

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Henry Anthony Adamson (21-01-1871 - 21-08-1941) British composer

Henry Anthony Adamson was a "powerful mathematician (...) and a brilliant chess problem analyst" (T.R.Dawson in Adamson's obituary in the British Chess Magazine). A mostly retro and fairy composer, he was also a good chess player and also composed endgames and direct mate problems.
In "Perdurabo: the Life of Aleister Crowley", Richard Kaczynski tells that as a student at Trinity College, Henry Anthony Adamson "profoundly changed Crowley's life by introducing him to the poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley."


Here is the first pawn endgame on this blog, and hopefully not the last:

Adamson, Henry Anthony
The Chess Amateur, 1915 (0339)


+ 2 + 2

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If you happen to be interested in learning more about the intricacies of this endgame, you may browse John D. Beasley's BESN supplement No.1 "The Studies of H. A. Adamson". You will also discover stimulating endgames as well as other biographical details.


Rudolf Bania (21-01-1905 - ?) Czech composer

Bania, Rudolf
SSŘ 1949
3rd Prize


#3 6 + 7

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A short but pointed study:

Bania, Rudolf
Morgenzeitung, 1928
Honorable Mention


+ 4 + 3

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7 comments:

  1. The Nissl-Tarrasch game doesn't come up when you click on the link, Eric.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I tried for awhile to come up with a more complex version of the simple but pointed Bania study. In the end, after many wasted hours, I came to the conclusion that he did it just right. There are some studies that are deservedly short, and better in that form (Zeitoekonomie; and usually when you violate that, you end up violating Raum- and Materieloekonomie at the same time).

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have checked the link with Firefox and Internet Explorer and sometimes there seems to be a problem on this newinchess website. Have you tried a Refresh on the page?
    If you enter http://www.newinchess.com/NICBase/ and search a game with Nissl as player for White, the single result is the Nissl-Tarrasch game.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Kauders also appears to have been a strong player:

    http://www.edochess.ca/players/p886.html

    None of his games appear to have survived.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes, refreshing helps, and what a game! A beautiful model mate at the end, unfortunately by Tarrasch! But he shows how to play his own defense well, what he named "The Correct Defense to the Queen's Gambit."

    ReplyDelete
  6. I perfectly agree with you about the Bania study: it is better to keep the crystal clear idea than to try to complicate matters.

    Glad you enjoyed the Nissl - Tarrasch game. The pawn mate was a nice touch.

    ReplyDelete